10 Powerful Health Benefits of Bone Broth (Plus, a Bonus Recipe!)

What if I told you there was a special tonic that exists that has special nourishing and healing powers? Some even consider it a “youth serum” due to its ability to nourish and rejuvenate the entire body.

What if drinking this tonic could help to nourish and heal your joints? Plus, improve your digestion, heal your gut, and provide you with the nutrients you need to grow and sustain a healthy body?

Are you intrigued?

I would think so, considering the millions of people suffering from arthritis, joint issues, and digestive disorders. Many people spend a lot of money looking for a magic pill that might help them to feel good and live longer.

Well, I’m here to tell you this special tonic is a healing secret from our ancestors and is available to us all. Plus, you can make it in your own home. This health elixir I am speaking of is bone broth. Bone broth is easy to make, delicious, and cost-effective. And the health benefits are plentiful.

What Is Bone Broth?

Before humans began cooking food, our ancestors used the bones of small animals mixed with water to create a nutrient-dense paste. Traditional cultures around the world passed down the wisdom of the healing power of bones throughout generations. Sadly, this wisdom is rarely used in our modern American diet.

We’re bringing real bone broth back!

With the introduction of flavor enhancers and artificial ingredients, we began taking short cuts. Now, broths are cheaply made and sold in boxes for convenient cooking. Yes, it’s convenient to grab the boxed or canned broth. But so many health and life-giving nutrients are lost.

Bone Broth Nutrition Facts

Why should you include bone broth into your diet? Low in calories and high in health value — there’s no doubt bone broth packs a nutritional punch!

Let’s take a deeper look.

Minerals and electrolytes found in bone broth include:

  • Calcium
  • Phosphorus
  • Magnesium
  • Potassium

Bone broths provide our bodies with easily absorbed minerals. These come from the cartilage, tendons, and bones of the animal (in addition to trace minerals and electrolytes from vegetables).

This is important considering how depleted our soil is of minerals today. Moreover, we’re not likely getting all the nutrients we need from our diets (even if the majority of our diet is organic, unprocessed, and pasture-raised).  

Amino acids found in bone broth include:

  • Glycine
  • Proline
  • Glutamine

The various amino acids in bone broth are the building blocks of protein. Our bodies use protein to break down food, repair tissue, grow, and perform various bodily functions.

Collagen found in bone broth:

Bone broths also provide our bodies with gelatin. The gelatin is what’s left after the collagen is removed from the bones by boiling them.

Gelatin heals and nourishes our cartilage, bones, skin, arteries, digestive tract, and various other tissues of the body. This gelatin component is able to help heal and seal our intestinal tract.

Anyone with gut or digestive-related issues, listen up! Or better yet, anyone with a gut: listen up — yes, that’s everyone! Approximately 80% of our immune system is in our gut.  

What does that mean?

It means that the health of our gut plays a crucial role in how healthy we are, our ability to stay healthy, and how well we can prevent disease. Most people don’t realize that many diseases, such as autoimmune conditions and neurological conditions, may begin with a compromised gut.1  

So remember — everyone can benefit from including bone broth in their diet!

Additional compounds found in bone broth include:

  • Healthy fats
  • Glycosaminoglycans (GAGs):
    • Glucosamine
    • Hyaluronic Acid
    • Chondroitin Sulfate

Minerals found in bone broth, in conjunction with growth factors called GAGs, provide us with the perfect recipe for building healthy bones and joints. GAGs are in collagen and help keep our tissue healthy.

Ever taken a glucosamine supplement for joint problems? Glucosamine is a GAG that helps build healthy joints. The health of our joints depends upon the quality and health of our collagen.

Bone broth is also an excellent source of healthy fats like omega-3 fatty acids and conjugated linoleic acid. Both of these healthy fats are linked to decreased inflammation and improved immunity.2

These benefits are amplified if the animal was grass-fed. Grass-fed beef is higher in nutrients, omega-3 fatty acids, and antioxidants.

10 Powerful Health Benefits of Bone Broth You Need to Know About

1. Bone Broth for Immunity

A study done on chicken soup found that it had a positive effect on treating infections.3 The study actually concluded that chicken soup has medicinal properties. Since chicken soup’s main ingredient is bone broth, this study is especially significant.

But that’s not all.

The anti-inflammatory effects of the amino acids and collagen helped to shorten the severity of upper respiratory infections like the common cold.

So there’s a real reason you crave that comforting bowl of chicken soup when you’re sick. It actually works!

2. Bone Broth for Joints

Achy joints are no joke. They’re painful and can stop you from doing the things you love.

As we age, the connective tissues surrounding our joints ages too. The cartilage inside thins and the lubricating fluid inside decreases.

The GAGs found in bone broth reduce the inflammation associated with painful joints. In one study, patients with osteoarthritis were given collagen.4 This supplementation helped to improve both pain and function for people dealing with this degenerative joint disease.

3. Bone Broth for Digestion

Gelatin is a potent mucosal barrier protector for our intestines. Gelatin reduces inflammation and heals the intestinal tract, even after an injury.5 You might be surprised to find out that many gastrointestinal diseases are due to altered permeability of the intestines.

Some of these gastrointestinal diseases include:

  • Enterocolitis
  • Inflammatory bowel disease
  • Irritable bowel syndrome
  • Small intestinal bacterial overgrowth
  • Celiac disease
  • Food Intolerances

The amino acid glutamine in bone broth protects the gut from injury, promotes optimal absorption, and improves intestinal lining.6

If we can do something as simple as drinking bone broth to help fight these painful and life-changing diseases, then there’s no reason to not give it a try.

4. Bone Broth for Detoxification

Bone broths also have large amounts of the amino acid glycine, which helps to detoxify the liver.7  Believe me, we all need help with liver detoxification.

We are bombarded with toxins daily, and our liver is in charge of filtering them all out. Liver detox is important in keeping a healthy body.

5. Bone Broth for Skin

The collagen in the bones helps improve skin elasticity and improve skin’s appearance.8 The amino acid proline also helps keep skin supple and smooth.

Not only do the amino acids found in bone broth fight the signs of aging, but the GAGs do too. GAGs work together to keep your skin hydrated, firm, and youthful-looking.

You probably even own a face cream or two with a few of these ingredients. And there’s a reason why — they really do work!

6. Bone Broth for Weight Loss

Bone broth satisfies your hunger. The gelatin in bone broth helps to keep you feeling fuller for longer.

Obese individuals who ate gelatin were better able to stick to their calorie-controlled diets than those who didn’t.9 This means sipping on a cup of bone broth keeps your hunger at bay.

You could even make a soup by adding some tasty bone broth and eating it as a meal. Soup not only tastes delicious, but it also fills you up quickly. This helps you to lose weight over time by decreasing the number of calories you eat each day.

7. Bone Broth for Hair Loss and Nails

Much of our hair and nails are made up of collagen. This protein helps to strengthen hair and nails. Without collagen, you’ll end up with dry and easily damaged locks — even hair loss.

Of course, nobody wants brittle, thinning hair.

Bone broth has a large amount of gelatin from collagen. The collagen also helps to moisturize and grow hair and nails.

So, drinking bone broth can help you get those luscious locks and healthy, strong nails you’ve always wanted.

8. Bone Broth for Inflammation

Inflammation is quite possibly the source of almost all disease processes. If we can reduce inflammation in our bodies, we can reclaim our health.

Chronic inflammation is associated with:

  • Cancer
  • Diabetes
  • Alzheimer’s disease
  • Heart disease
  • Arthritis
  • Autoimmune disorders

Gelatin has anti-inflammatory effects that inhibit cytokines and adhesion molecules in several inflammatory disorders.10 Cytokines and adhesion molecules both play a key role in the inflammatory response. Left uncontrolled, they can create a cascade of inflammation in your body.

In addition to bone broth, turmeric is well known for its anti-inflammatory effects on the body. Turmeric works to promote a healthy inflammation response in the body.

This is why I take NativePath Turmeric every day. This turmeric has helped ease my aches and pains. Plus, it helps me feel youthful and vibrant.

9. Bone Broth for Muscle

Elderly men who took collagen while doing resistance training increased their muscle mass and reduced body fat.11 Because the elderly are especially vulnerable to muscle loss, it’s important to be mindful of adequate protein intake.

Plus, amino acids, like those found in bone broth, are the building blocks of protein. Amino acids help you to maintain muscle mass and prevent muscle from breaking down.

If you’re someone who likes to exercise and lift weights, then listen up — bone broth is for you too.

10. Bone Broth for Teeth and Bones

Healthy bones and teeth need a wide variety of vitamins and minerals to stay strong. A poor diet leads to bones that are more easily broken and teeth with inadequate enamel.

One study found the nutrients needed for bone health are 12:

  • Vitamin D
  • Calcium
  • Magnesium
  • Protein
  • Vitamin K
  • Boron
  • Manganese
  • Copper
  • Zinc
  • Vitamin C
  • Silicon

A wonderful source of all these vitamins and minerals in bone broth made with nutrient-rich bones and vegetables.

Where to Get Bones to Make Bone Broth

When choosing bones to make bone broth, be sure to get quality bones from pasture-raised animals or wild-caught fish. Avoid getting bones from factory-farmed animals, as they’ve been pumped full of hormones and antibiotics.

Chicken, beef, and fish broths are the most commonly made, but you can use bones from other animals.  

You can get the bones from vendors at the Farmers’ Market or a local butcher. Sometimes you’ll get lucky and find a butcher who gives away bones for free.

How to Eat Bone Broth

There are so many ways to enjoy the healing benefits of bone broth.

A few I like are:

  • Drinking bone broth in a mug just like coffee or tea — warm it up on the stove and add a little sea salt.  I think it’s delicious, and I can feel the goodness pouring into my body. I’ve even used bone broth as a key component in my own gut healing and restoration of my health. I also drink more if I am feeling tired or beginning to feel sick, and I seem to bounce back quickly.
  • I also keep bone broth handy to make the most amazing soups. I like to make a bowl of healing chicken soup for when I’m not feeling so well. I’ve also made bone marrow soups and just about any type of soup you can think of. You can incorporate bone broth so easily into soups.
  • Adding bone broth to your favorite sauces is a wonderful way to add in some of this healthy goodness to your diet. Homemade bone broth adds a richness to sauces that can’t be matched with water or store-bought broths.

Bone Broth Recipe

I typically roast a chicken and save the carcass to make broth. If you can find chicken feet to add to the bone broth, buy them. Chicken feet make your bone broth super tasty and rich. I like to get my chicken, beef, and fish bones from the Farmers’ Market.

You’ll also need a crockpot or stockpot. I like to use a crockpot so I can allow the bones to cook for a long period with minimal fuss.

Ingredients:

  • 1 gallon of filtered water
  • 4 cups coarsely chopped vegetables (onions, celery, carrots, etc.)
  • 1 tablespoon salt
  • 2 tablespoons vinegar
  • 2 pounds bones from different parts of the animal, including marrow bones (we recommend grass-fed beef bones)
  1. Place the bones in the pot and cover with filtered water.  
  2. Add vinegar and salt and let the bones soak for an hour or two. This helps pull the good stuff out of the bones.
  3. Bring to a boil. Foam and impurities rise to the top. Simply take a spoon and skim them off.
  4. Add the veggies, cover, and turn down the heat to simmer or low heat. Remember, a low and slow cooking process with help to fully remove all the beneficial nutrients from the bones. Chicken bones can cook for up to 24 hours and beef bones for up to 48 hours.
  5. Remove bones and discard the veggies. Your bone broth is ready to eat right away or store for later use. Enjoy!

I believe the best bone broth is made at home. Nothing compares to the fresh and pure taste of homemade broth. Foods made with REAL bone broth taste so much better than the stuff in the carton.

Bring Back the Real Bone Broth

I hope this post inspires you to incorporate homemade bone broth into your diet. I was a little intimidated at first to try this, but it truly is easy once you get in the habit of it. Plus, adding bone broth to your diet is a cheap way to provide your body with so many wonderful, health-promoting, and healing nutrients.  

The collagen in bone broth is pretty hard to beat. But if you want to add more collagen to your diet and don’t have time in your busy schedule to whip up some bone broth, try NativePath Collagen. This collagen comes from only grass-fed animals. An added bonus: there are no fillers or additives — just 100% collagen. Perfect for when you’re out of time or on the go!

Make a batch of bone broth and let me know what you think in the comments below. I’d love to hear from you!

Join me in bringing back bone broth to give you the vibrant health and vitality that is your birthright!

References:

  1. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3337124/
  2. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3933057/
  3. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11035691
  4. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17076983
  5. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25855934
  6. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24965526
  7. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5350494/
  8. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5707681/
  9. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18319637
  10. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3358810/
  11. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26353786
  12. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3330619/




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