26 High-Fiber Foods to Add to Your Grocery List

December 14, 2023

Did you know that people spend an average of 44 minutes shopping every time they go to the grocery store? And if you’re anything like me, you’re trying to get in and out of there as quickly as possible.

The caveat…this “speed shopping” may cause you to buy the same foods every week. This may lead to a lack of variety and, therefore, a lack of important nutrients like fiber (a carbohydrate that 95% of Americans don’t get enough of).

To help you out, I compiled a list of 26 healthy, natural, high-fiber foods that you can add to your grocery list this week. Eat these, and your daily intake of fiber will be right where it needs to be. Let’s get into it.

Table Of Contents

1. Avocados

Although they’re known for their heart-healthy fats, avocados are actually packed with fiber. They also provide vitamin C, potassium, magnesium, vitamin E, and various B vitamins.

One cup of sliced avocado (146 grams) contains (2):

Calories :234
Protein :3 g
Carbs :12.5 g
Fat :21.5 g
Fiber :10 g

2. Baobab

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Originating from the “Tree of Life” across Africa, Madagascar, and Australia, the baobab fruit is a large, hard-shelled fruit with a pulp that’s abundant in both soluble and insoluble fiber. Just two tablespoons of baobab powder deliver an impressive 9 grams of fiber, coupled with essential nutrients like vitamin C, calcium, potassium, magnesium, and antioxidants. Regular consumption of baobab fruit can help alleviate constipation, regulate blood sugar, and even aid in weight loss.

Two tablespoons of powdered baobab (20 grams) provide approximately (1):

Calories :50
Protein :1 g
Carbs :16 g
Fat :0 g
Fiber :9 g

3. Peas

Peas are a worthwhile addition to increasing the fiber in your diet. They’re also loaded with vitamin C, carotenoids, and flavonoids, which are great for your heart and cardiovascular system.

One cup of peas (145 grams) contains (3):

Calories :117
Protein :8 g
Carbs :21 g
Fat :.6 g
Fiber :8 g

4. Raspberries

One cup of raspberries packs 8 grams of fiber into just 64 calories. In addition to fiber, they provide essential minerals like potassium, which is crucial for maintaining optimal heart function and potentially reducing blood pressure. Plus, manganese which is a mineral vital for promoting healthy bones and skin while aiding in blood sugar regulation. Furthermore, the omega-3 fatty acids in raspberries can help prevent stroke and heart disease.

One cup of raspberries (123 grams) contains (4):

Calories :64
Protein :1.5 g
Carbs :15 g
Fat :.8 g
Fiber :8 g
A hand pouring a scoop of NativePath Native Fiber from the container into a glass of water

Restore Your Gut Health

With a slight citrus flavor, just one scoop equips you with 4 grams of Baobab and 200 milligrams of L-Glutamine to support digestion, bowel regularity, and colon health.

Add to Cart

5. Spinach

Spinach is an extremely nutrient-rich vegetable. It packs high amounts of fiber, carotenoids, vitamin C, vitamin K, folic acid, iron, and calcium.

One bunch of spinach (340 grams)  contains (5):

Calories :78
Protein :9.7 g
Carbs :12 g
Fat :1.3 g
Fiber :7.5 g

6. Artichokes

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In addition to adding fiber to your diet, artichokes have some of the highest antioxidant levels among all vegetables (6).

One medium artichoke (128 grams) contains (7):

Calories :60
Protein :4.1 g
Carbs :13.4 g
Fat :.2 g
Fiber :6.9 g

7. Prunes

​​Prunes are often a remedy for constipation, and for good reason. Prunes are a good source of both insoluble and soluble fiber. They’re also rich in potassium, a mineral that helps your muscles, nerves, and heart function properly.

A half cup of prunes (87 grams) contains (8): 

Calories :209
Protein :1.9 g
Carbs :55.5 g
Fat :.3 g
Fiber :6.2 g

8. Pears (With Skin)

Juicy and sweet pears are a great source of soluble fiber. This type of fiber can help relieve constipation, lower cholesterol levels, help keep you feeling full, and control blood sugar. 

A medium pear with skin (178 grams) contains (9):

Calories :112
Protein :.7 g
Carbs :27 g
Fat :.3 g
Fiber :5.5 g

9. Mangoes

Besides being a delicious source of dietary fiber, one of the most impressive nutrient facts about mangoes is that just 1 cup (165 grams) of fresh mango provides nearly 67% of your recommended vitamin C. Vitamin C aids your immune system, helps your body absorb iron, and promotes cell growth and repair.

One large mango (336 grams) contains (10):

Calories :202
Protein :2.8 g
Carbs :50.4 g
Fat :1.3 g
Fiber :5.4 g

10. Apples (With Skin)

In addition to fiber, apples have the added benefit of containing a ton of vitamin C and antioxidants. Just be sure to eat your apple with the fiber-rich skin on.

A medium apple with skin (182 grams) contains (11): 

Calories :95
Protein :.5 g
Carbs :25 g
Fat :.3 g
Fiber :4.4 g

11. Chestnuts

Chestnuts are a great source of fiber, with 15% of your daily needs in just 10 nuts. They also contain many vitamins and minerals, such as copper, manganese, vitamin B6, vitamin C, thiamine, folate, riboflavin, and potassium. 

10 chestnuts (83 grams) contains (12):

Calories :206
Protein :2.7 g
Carbs :44.5 g
Fat :1.9 g
Fiber :4.3 g
A hand pouring a scoop of NativePath Native Fiber from the container into a glass of water

Be Part of the 5% to Eat Enough Fiber

With a slight citrus flavor, just one scoop equips you with 4 grams of Baobab and 200 milligrams of L-Glutamine to support digestion, bowel regularity, and colon health.

Add to Cart

12. Coconut (Shaved)

Coconut is a unique fruit not only because of its high fiber but also its fat content. Most of these fats are medium-chain triglycerides (MCTs), which are absorbed intact in your small intestine and used by your body to produce energy. It also contains a variety of minerals, including manganese, copper, selenium, phosphorus, potassium, and iron.

A half cup of shaved coconut (45 grams) contains (13):

Calories :159
Protein :1.5 g
Carbs :6.8 g
Fat :15.1 g
Fiber :4.1 g

13. Sweet Potatoes

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Along with their 4 grams of fiber per cup, sweet potatoes are a good source of calcium, potassium, and vitamins A and C, which help keep your bones and immune system healthy. Potassium could also help you maintain regular blood pressure.

One cup of sweet potato (133 grams) contains (14):

Calories :114
Protein :2 g
Carbs :26.7 g
Fat :.1 g
Fiber :4 g

14. Almonds

Almonds pack a lot into their small shell. They are rich in nutrients like fiber, healthy fats, vitamin E, manganese, and magnesium.

One ounce or roughly 23 almonds (28 grams) contains (15):

Calories :164
Protein :6 g
Carbs :6.1 g
Fat :14.1 g
Fiber :3.5 g

15. Pistachios

Pistachios are high in protein, fiber, and antioxidants. They also boast several other important nutrients, including vitamin B6 and potassium.

A quarter cup of pistachios (31 grams) contains (16):

Calories :172
Protein :6.2 g
Carbs :8.4 g
Fat :13.9 g
Fiber :3.3 g

16. Sunflower Seeds

Sunflower seeds are excellent sources of several nutrients—including vitamin E and selenium—and beneficial plant compounds that can support fertility and help prevent chronic diseases.

A quarter cup of sunflower seeds (35 grams) contains (17):

Calories :205
Protein :7.3 g
Carbs :7 g
Fat :18 g
Fiber :3.3 g

17. Brussels Sprouts

Not only will eating Brussels sprouts help you reach daily fiber goals, but they may reduce your cancer risk, too. Research shows that cruciferous vegetables like Brussels sprouts, broccoli, and cauliflower contain a natural chemical that may prevent cancer from growing (18).

One cup of Brussels sprouts (88 grams) contains (19): 

Calories :38
Protein :3 g
Carbs :7.9 g
Fat :.3 g
Fiber :3.3 g

18. Carrots

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Carrots aren’t just good for your eyes, they’re also great for your gut. In addition to fiber, carrots provide vitamin K, vitamin B6, magnesium, and beta carotene, an antioxidant that gets turned into vitamin A in your body.

One medium carrot (100 grams) contains (20):

Calories :48
Protein :1 g
Carbs :10.3 g
Fat :.4 g
Fiber :3.1 g

19. Oranges

Many types of oranges are high in fiber and beneficial vitamins, like vitamin C. They also contain antioxidants, which can have various health benefits, including immune system support.

A medium orange (140 g) contains (21):

Calories :73
Protein :1.3 g
Carbs :16.5 g
Fat :.2 g
Fiber :2.8 g

20. Chia Seeds

Chia seeds are highly nutritious, tiny black seeds. They are an excellent source of fiber and contain high amounts of magnesium, phosphorus, and calcium.

One tablespoon of chia seeds (7 grams) contains (22): 

Calories :35
Protein :1.2 g
Carbs :3 g
Fat :2.2 g
Fiber :2.5 g

21. Flax Seeds

Along with fiber, flax seeds contain lignans, unique plant nutrients that get converted by our gut microbes to a form that could prevent certain types of cancer and heart disease (23). 

One tablespoon of flax seeds (7 grams) contains (24): 

Calories :38
Protein :1.2 g
Carbs :3 g
Fat :3 g
Fiber :1.9 g
A hand pouring a scoop of NativePath Native Fiber from the container into a glass of water

Give Your Digestive System a Boost

With a slight citrus flavor, just one scoop equips you with 4 grams of Baobab and 200 milligrams of L-Glutamine to support digestion, bowel regularity, and colon health.

Add to Cart

22. Broccoli

Broccoli is low in calories and high in fiber. Broccoli is also a good source of folate, which is protective against GI cancers. It also contains vitamin K, which is vital to maintaining healthy bones.  

One cup of broccoli (76 grams) contains (25):

Calories :30
Protein :2 g
Carbs :4.8 g
Fat :.3 g
Fiber :1.8 g

23. Dates

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In addition to fiber, dates contain several types of antioxidants, such as flavonoids, carotenoids, and phenolic acid, that may help prevent the development of certain chronic illnesses, such as heart disease, cancer, Alzheimer’s, and diabetes.

One pitted date (24 grams) contains (26):

Calories :67
Protein :.4 g
Carbs :18 g
Fat :0 g
Fiber :1.6 g

24. Raisins

Along with fiber, raisins are a great source of antioxidants. Antioxidants help remove free radicals from your blood and may prevent damage to your cells and DNA, which can lead to diseases like cancer, heart disease, and stroke.

A quarter cup of raisins (36 grams) contains (27):

Calories :109
Protein :1.2 g
Carbs :28.8 g
Fat :.1 g
Fiber :1.6 g

25. Figs

Dried figs, in particular, are a concentrated source of fiber. Just a few dried figs (about 1/4 cup or 40 grams) can provide around 3-4 grams of fiber. Fresh figs also offer fiber but in slightly lower quantities compared to their dried counterparts.

In addition to their high fiber content, figs are an excellent source of prebiotics. All the more reason to eat them for optimal gut health, digestion, and regularity.

One medium fig (50 grams) contains (28):

Calories :37
Protein :.4 g
Carbs :9.6 g
Fat :.2 g
Fiber :1.5 g

26. Apricots

Apricots are a great source of both soluble and insoluble fiber. A cup of sliced fresh apricots contains around 3 grams of fiber, while a cup of dried apricots can provide significantly more, roughly 7-8 grams of fiber.

Two (70 grams) apricots contain (29):

Calories :34
Protein :1 g
Carbs :7.8 g
Fat :.3 g
Fiber :1.4 g

Other High-Fiber Foods (That You May Want to Avoid)

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If you're wondering whether legumes like black, pinto, and chickpea and whole grains like oats, quinoa, and pasta are high in fiber, they are. We just don't recommend them. 

Most of these foods contain gluten (a hard-to-digest protein that can irritate and inflame the gut lining), lectin (a compound that acts as a natural defense mechanism and can affect digestion and nutrient absorption), and phytates (anti-nutrients that prevent the body from absorbing the nutrients from legumes).

Here’s a quick list of foods that are high-fiber but may also irritate your gut or affect nutrient absorption:

  1. Lentils
  2. Chickpeas (garbanzo beans)
  3. Black beans
  4. Kidney beans
  5. Oats (oatmeal, rolled oats)
  6. Quinoa
  7. Brown rice
  8. Barley
  9. Whole wheat products (bread, pasta)
  10. Popcorn (air-popped, without excess butter or salt)
  11. Bran cereal
  12. Whole grain bread
  13. Edamame (young soybeans)

I hope these lists help you reach your daily fiber AND keep your shopping trips speedy!

Kat Kennedy
Article by

Kat Kennedy

Kat Kennedy is the Fitness and Nutrition Editor at NativePath. With a NASM CPT, NCSF CPT, and NCSF Sports Nutrition Certification, she has a passion for giving people the tools they need to feel healthy, strong, and confident.

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    Medical Disclaimer

    This content is for informational and educational purposes only. It is not intended to provide medical advice or to take the place of such advice or treatment from a personal physician. All readers/viewers of this content are advised to consult their doctors or qualified health professionals regarding specific health questions. Neither Dr. Chad Walding nor the publisher of this content takes responsibility for possible health consequences of any person or persons reading or following the information in this educational content. All viewers of this content, especially those taking prescription or over-the-counter medications, should consult their physicians before beginning any nutrition, supplement, or lifestyle program.

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